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Welding Rod Fumes linked to Parkinson's Disease and other Illnesses



Welding can be dangerous to your health. Every time the welder strikes an arc, toxic fumes can be released which pose serious health threats to the welder and others that work in the same area. It has been identified that inhaling fumes generated from cutting or heating steel can cause health risks such as lung disease and neurological damage.

Manufacturers of welding materials know that welding rods produce different gases when they reach high temperatures. Some of the gases and toxic substances released during the welding process include nitrogen dioxide, ozone, carbon monoxide, fluorine, manganese, copper, lead, and cadmium. These substances can be released into the air during the following welding job activities: gas metal arc or metal inert gas (MIG) welding, gas tungsten arc or tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, flux cored arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, brazing, thermal cutting, metal pouring or gauging.

Risks of Welding Rod Fumes

The gas with the greatest potential to cause harm is Manganese. Manganese has been found in stainless steel, carbon steel and in welding rods. Exposure to manganese has been linked to early onset of Parkinson's disease and a related condition called manganism. Parkinson's is currently ranked the 14th highest cause of death in the U.S. Recent reports also indicate that exposure to the above substances can increase risks of pneumonitis, bronchitis, and lung disease.

In a recent welding product lawsuit, a jury awarded $1 million to a man claiming his Parkinson's disease was caused by years of exposure to welding fumes. Parkinson's or Parkinsonism is a neurological disorder with physical symptoms that increase with time. Symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease include tremors, disorientation, memory loss, fatigue, headache, muscle cramps, loss of appetite, apathy, insomnia, weakness, speech disturbances, impairment of judgment, anxiety, hallucinations or delusions, stiffness in arms and legs, and loss of muscular control.

A leading law firm is investigating claims against manufacturers of welding products (steel-alloy welding rods, wires, and electrodes) for use in a potential class action lawsuit. If you or someone you love is a welder or worked in a welding facility and is suffering from any of these serious conditions, you may have the right to file a claim or to join in a possible class action lawsuit.

Welding Injuries and Lawsuits In the News

18 welding workers file a class action lawsuit against 55+ companies who manufacturer, distribute, sell, or promote welding rod equipment. Defendants claim injuries caused by exposure to welding rod fumes. (Aug-09-05) [BUSINESSWIRE]

Welding fumes have led workers to make claims against a contractor for allegedly knowingly exposing workers to welding fumes and particulate for more than a year. One worker diagnosed with Restrictive Pulmonary Disease. (Apr-07-05) [NEW BAY BRIDGE]

Register your Welding Case

If you or a loved one has been exposed to welding fumes or particulates and now suffers from Parkinson's disease or other illnesses, you may qualify for damages or remedies that may be awarded in a possible class action lawsuit. Please fill in our form on the right to submit your complaint and we will have a lawyer review your welding complaint.

By submitting this form, you are asking lawyers to contact you. You are under no obligation to accept their services and you are free to choose which lawyer you want to work with. Lawyers are usually paid out of the proceeds of the settlement or verdict rendered.

At LawyersandSettlements.com, it is our goal to keep you informed about important legal cases and settlements. We are dedicated to helping you resolve your legal complaints.

Justice for Everyone
Last updated November 28 2005

Reader Comments

Posted by

on
Ive been a welder since 1988.tig. stick mig and soldering i am 52 yrs old i have copd really bad and my hands are sterting to shake not all the time but i notice its getting worse pluse i have a tingling sensation in my arm at times and numbness in my fingers and insomnia

Posted by

on
Im trying to find out if my dad was apart of the suit for welding fumes. We are having trouble locating him and are affarid something may have happen to him. His name is Marvin Wayne Bussard
11/26/51 is his birthday i think. Please contact me @ bxxxxx@gmail.com

Posted by

on
I am 44, , I was mig,tig,stick welder for 20 years,I use a inhailer,numbness, had file disability, bein 6yrs, cant get it, had 5 surgerys.Its bad.

Posted by

on
I was searching to see if I might have parkinsons and came upon this. I have been a welder for 30 years and have started feeling like I have the symptoms for parkinsons. What do I need to do?

Posted by

on
I have been a welder for 43 years. My left hand shakes if it I try to do even a simple task also have numbness in both hands at times. I have filed for MESO. Would this enterfere with a suit with the welding fumes. There where no manufacturers of welding rods noted in the MESO paperwork. I have been told that Lincoln Electric put Asbestos in there rod coatings years ago when I started welding in 1974. I did smoke at a eraly age but quit years ago. I also have shortness of breath which is increasing I think rapidly over pass few years. As of right now I have numbness in my fingers just texting this message. I started welding in a shipyard and was in what they called double bottoms where there wasn't much ventilation. Even as I moved on to other jobs welding fumes where inhaled constantly on various jobs. Surely this occupation has hindered my health, but it was what I chose to do. Would there be any compensation for myself and or others who have been in my position.

Posted by

on
My husband started welding in 1964 at the age of 24 in a New Orleans ship yard. Also welded navy ships at the Jacksonville ship yard and welded dumpsters at a iron shop. Was a welder for approximately 6 years. He's now 71 and has COPD and has labored breathing.

Posted by

on
I am a former welder with symptoms of tremors,, fatigue, headache, muscle cramps, loss of appetite, insomnia, weakness, anxiety, and stiffness in arms and legs. I have worked as a MIG welder/ SMAW / Plasma cutting / FCAW and Oxy-fuel Torch cutting over 8 years beginning from 1998-2008 in the state of Wisconsin and Florida where I currently live. I have had flash burns severe enough to require immediate medical attention. I would like information to determine if I am eligible for this case.

Posted by

on
Personal health has deteriorated since welding job. Going to doctors on a regular basis and scheduled again at the end of the month.

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